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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
QDOT trust
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.
QDRO
See Qualified Domestic Relations Order.
QMSCO
See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.
QTIP trust
A type of trust for wealthy married couples that allows a surviving spouse to postpone estate taxes. A QTIP trust allows the surviving spouse to make use of the trust property tax-free. Taxes are deferred until the surviving spouse dies and the trust property is received by the final trust beneficiaries, who were named by the first spouse to die.
Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO)
A court order that uses pension or retirement benefits to provide alimony or child support, or to divide marital property, at divorce.This special order is necessary to comply with federal law governing retirement pay.
Qualified Medical Child Support Order (QMSCO)
A court order that provides health benefit coverage for the child of the noncustodial parent under that parent's group health plan.
quantum meruit
The reasonable value of services provided, which a winning party may be able to recover from an opponent who broke a contract.
quasi-community property
A form of property owned by a married couple. If a couple moves to a community property state from a non-community property state, property they acquired together in the non-community property state may be considered quasi-community property. Quasi-community property is treated just like community property when one spouse dies or if the couple divorces.
quiet enjoyment
The right of a property owner or tenant to enjoy his or her property without interference. Disruption of quiet enjoyment may constitute a nuisance. Leases and rental agreements often contain a "covenant of quiet enjoyment," expressly obligating the landlord to see that tenants have the opportunity to live undisturbed.
quitclaim deed
A deed that transfers whatever ownership interest the transferor has in a particular property. The deed does not guarantee anything about what is being transferred, however. For example, a divorcing husband may quitclaim his interest in certain real estate to his ex-wife, officially giving up any legal interest in the property. Compare grant deed.